Xi highlights independent IPR, core technologiesirs a meet

Meeting in Nanchang eyes achieving new advances in development of country’s central region

President Xi Jinping stressed the significance of owning indep

endent intellectual property rights and core technology while visiting a producer of rare

earth, which he hailed as an “important strategic resource”, in Gan­zhou, Jiangxi province, on Monday.

Xi, also general secretary of the Communist Party of Chin

a Central Committee and chairman of the Central Military Commission, visited the JL MAG Ra

re-Earth Co immediately after he arrived in Jiangxi for the three-day inspection tour.

At the company, Xi learned about its production and operation, the r

are earth industry’s development in Ganzhou, the development and application of the co

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improved markedly. Their population has grown fro

rom about 2 million in the 1950s to about 13 million, and their religious rights and practices are protected by the law.

Nor would it adopt a double standard and criticize China’s efforts to counter terrorism and extremism. Last year, tourists fr

om home and abroad paid more than 150 million trips to Xinjiang, thanks to the improved security situation in

the region. That Xinjiang has not witnessed any violent or terrorist incidents in recent years proves the effect

iveness of the joint efforts of the government and local people in maintaining regional peace and stability.

Xinjiang is undoubtedly in its best development stage in histo

ry. Facts speak louder than words, but still they cannot wake up persons pretending to be asleep.

The targeting of Hikvision is just par for the course for the curren

t US administration, which is obsessed with impeding China’s development.

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ietnam surpassed India to become the largest buyer of Chin

a’s photovoltaic products. Export value to Vietnam rose 239 times to $739 million in the fi

rst quarter, taking up 16.8 percent of China’s total photovoltaic export value.

With the European Union ending its anti-dumping and anti-subsidy meas

ures, photovoltaic exports from China to Europe also saw large increase in Q1.

The country’s photovoltaic products export volume to the Netherlands and Spain increased 1,049.6 percent and 158.3 perc

ent, respectively, in the first quarter, said the report. It predicted that the emerging markets, such as Mexico, Aus

tralia, Turkey, and the United Arab Emirates will further boost the export of China’s photovoltaic modules.

The export of China’s photovoltaic products to the United States dropped 28.9 pe

rcent to just 0.01 GW in the first quarter, the report said. The Section 201, Section 3

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Father of slain student petitions court for death penalty

It’s been nearly a year since Xie Diao, a postgraduate student of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, was stabbed seven tim

es to death by his high school classmate Zhou Kaixuan at a restaurant outside the school.

Xie Zhonghua, father of Xie Diao, has been immersed in grief in the past year: He often

dreamed of his son, but then would suddenly awaken and start sobbing uncontrollably.

The case will finally be heard in Beijing First Intermediate People’s Court on May 24. To get justice for his son, Xie Zhon

ghua took to the streets and publicized the case, gathering tens of thousands of signatures that he has su

bmitted to the court. He hopes that, through his petition, the court would sentence Zhou to death.

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Xinjiang to launch up to 100 trains for tourists

As tours to Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region have become increasingly popular among tourists from home and abroad, local

authorities have announced a plan recently to launch as many as 100 special trains for tourists from May to October.

The local railway authorities will step up cooperation with other part

s of the country to boost Xinjiang’s tourism development, according to Huang Ti

ngfen, deputy general manager of Xinjiang Railway Tourism Development Group.

The trains will provide easier access to both the southern and northern parts of Xinjia

ng, said Huang. It will also be more convenient for Xinjiang residents to travel to other parts of the country.

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ponds and lakes dotting the pasture, but thanks to an im

anks to an improved ecosystem, fish are returning to those waters.

The 38-year-old says his father once grazed his flock in this area of northwest China’s X

injiang Uygur autonomous region, which he described as being “barren and more like a desert back in the day”.

The Tarim River runs 1,321 kilometers along the rim of the barren Tarim Basin, a sparsely populated area about the size of Poland.

Excessive irrigation in the past used up too much water, which caused the lower 400 km of t

he Tarim River to run dry in the early 1970s and pushed surrounding trees to the verge of disappearance.

Born in the village of Yengisu by the dried-up river, Ahmat never saw the water as a child. Sa

nd would slowly cover the caked riverbed. To find water, Ahmat’s family and flock had to move 200 km north.

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Before his retirement, Wang irrigated farmland for de

nd for decades and witnessed local farmers’ continuous battles against sandstorms.

“It didn’t just feel like a black storm, it was as if the whole desert was approachi

ng,” recalls Liu Conghui, a writer who was born, and still lives, near the farm Wang once worked.

As the menacing sandstorms made the area increasingly inhospitable, Liu’s whole community planned to up sticks.

To restore the local ecosystem, the Chinese government launched

a 10.7 billion yuan ($1.6 billion) project in 2001. A set of measures were adopted such as sav

ing water, converting farmland into grassland, providing treatment for dry riverways and building dams. In addition to t

hose measures, industrial and agricultural use of water in cities and counties along the river was limited.

Over the past two decades, Xinjiang has infused 7.7 billion cubic meters of water into

the dry trunk stream of the lower reaches of the Tarim River in 19 rounds of water diversion.

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On Monday morning, Xi visited the JL MAG Rare-Earth

 Co and learned about the company’s production of rare earths and the development of the rare earth industry in Ganzhou.

On the heels of the United States government announcement it will ban unauthorized exports of US technology to Hua

wei, by Monday, a number of major US tech giants, including Google, had reportedly stopped supplies.

Amid the escalating tit-for-tat trade blows between the world’s tw

o largest economies, the US putting Huawei, the face of Chinese hi-tech progress, on its Ent

ity List is no doubt a calculated blow to hit China and Huawei where it hurts. “America will probably use its ability to with

hold components from Huawei as a bargaining chip in a future trade deal with China,” The Economist reckons.

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The number of unicorns in a given city is often consid

ered a barometer of innovation and entrepreneurship.

The majority of China’s unicorns are based in Beijing, Shanghai, Hangzhou and Shenzhe

n, with a combined number of 156, 19 more than the previous year and accounting for 77.2 percent of the total.

Nanjing, Guangzhou, Wuhan and Qingdao are new gathering places for unicorns, the report said.

Driven by global capital, China’s unicorns have accelerated the pa

ce at which they go public, with unicorns now taking an average of 71 months to IPO.

From January 2017 to May 2019, 36 unicorns were listed on the global stock market, with eight in 2017 and 21 in 2018.

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The corn kernels burst out even in the cornstalk, just like

 popcorn,” said Liu Yueming, a technician in the promotion of scientific cultivation i

n the province. “It felt like the surface temperature was as high as 60 C. It’s a catastrophe.”

He said that some springs in a village called Haikou had drie

d up and the villagers didn’t have enough drinking water. “The village has 29 small water res

ervoirs, however, 14 of them have been used up so far. The drought is beyond imagination.”

“The villagers are doing everything they can to have enough drinki

ng water and then to also save as much as possible for their crops,” he added.

The region is also at greater risk of forest fires because of the high temperatures and low humidity.

The Yunnan Meteorological Bureau warned the public on May 13 about more dry

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